Bosses Of The Senate Dbq Essay

 

The Bosses of the Senate

  • Title: The Bosses of the Senate
  • Date Created/Published: 1889.
  • Medium: 1 print : lithograph.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-494 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-9678 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1889 (Case X) [P&P]
  • Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
  • Notes:
    • Lithograph by J. Ottmann after drawing by J. Keppler.
    • Illus. in: Puck, (1889 Jan. 23).
    • This record contains unverified, old data from caption card.
  • Collections:
  • Bookmark This Record:
       http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2002718861/

View the MARC Record for this item.

Rights assessment is your responsibility.

The Library of Congress generally does not own rights to material in its collections and, therefore, cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material. For further rights information, see "Rights Information" below and the Rights and Restrictions Information page ( http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/rights.html ).

  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-494 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-9678 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1889 (Case X) [P&P]
  • Medium: 1 print : lithograph.

Rights assessment is your responsibility.

If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

  1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG..., then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
  2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

    If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

  3. If there is no information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can generally purchase a quality copy through Duplication Services. Cite the Call Number listed above and include the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

  • Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1889 (Case X) [P&P]
  • Medium: 1 print : lithograph.

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

  1. Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)
    • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.

      As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)

    • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

  2. Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?
    • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.

    • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

  3. If you do not see a thumbnail image or a reference to another surrogate, please fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room. In many cases, the originals can be served in a few minutes. Other materials require appointments for later the same day or in the future. Reference staff can advise you in both how to fill out a call slip and when the item can be served.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.

 

The Bosses of the Senate

  • Title: The Bosses of the Senate
  • Date Created/Published: 1889.
  • Medium: 1 print : lithograph.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-494 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-9678 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1889 (Case X) [P&P]
  • Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
  • Notes:
    • Lithograph by J. Ottmann after drawing by J. Keppler.
    • Illus. in: Puck, (1889 Jan. 23).
    • This record contains unverified, old data from caption card.
  • Collections:
  • Bookmark This Record:
       http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2002718861/

View the MARC Record for this item.

Rights assessment is your responsibility.

The Library of Congress generally does not own rights to material in its collections and, therefore, cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material. For further rights information, see "Rights Information" below and the Rights and Restrictions Information page ( http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/rights.html ).

  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-494 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-9678 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1889 (Case X) [P&P]
  • Medium: 1 print : lithograph.

Rights assessment is your responsibility.

If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

  1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG..., then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
  2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

    If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

  3. If there is no information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can generally purchase a quality copy through Duplication Services. Cite the Call Number listed above and include the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

  • Call Number: Illus. in AP101.P7 1889 (Case X) [P&P]
  • Medium: 1 print : lithograph.

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

  1. Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)
    • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.

      As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)

    • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

  2. Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?
    • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.

    • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

  3. If you do not see a thumbnail image or a reference to another surrogate, please fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room. In many cases, the originals can be served in a few minutes. Other materials require appointments for later the same day or in the future. Reference staff can advise you in both how to fill out a call slip and when the item can be served.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.

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current10:48, 27 February 2013610 × 397 (361 KB)(talk | contribs){{Artwork |artist={{Creator:Joseph Ferdinand Keppler}} |title=''The Bosses of the Senate'' |description=''The Bosses of the Senate'', a cartoon by Joseph Keppler. First published in ''Puck'' 1889. (This version published by the J. Ottmann Lith. Co. and...
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Artist
TitleThe Bosses of the Senate
Description

The Bosses of the Senate, a cartoon by Joseph Keppler. First published in Puck 1889. (This version published by the J. Ottmann Lith. Co. and held by the

Date
MediumLithograph, colored
DimensionsHeight: 12 inches (30.48 cm) Width: 18.5 inches (46.99 cm)
Notes

Description from the website of the United States Senate:

"This frequently reproduced cartoon, long a staple of textbooks and studies of Congress, depicts corporate interests–from steel, copper, oil, iron, sugar, tin, and coal to paper bags, no, and salt–as giant money bags looming over the tiny senators at their desks in the Chamber. Joseph Keppler drew the cartoon, which appeared in Puck on January 23, 1889, showing a door to the gallery, the "people’s entrance," bolted and barred. The galleries stand empty while the special interests have floor privileges, operating below the motto: "This is the Senate of the Monopolists by the Monopolists and for the Monopolists!"
Keppler’s cartoon reflected the phenomenal growth of American industry in the 1880s, but also the disturbing trend toward concentration of industry to the point of monopoly, and its undue influence on politics. This popular perception contributed to Congress’s passage of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act in 1890."
Source/Photographerhttp://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/art/artifact/Ga_Cartoon/Ga_cartoon_38_00392.htm
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