Debates About Homework

  • Homework is the reason I fail.

    I am a high school junior, every day I get 12+ pages of homework minimum. Because I cannot possibly do all of this and help around the house as I am the only one able to do so, and therefore I have no time to study my material and therefore my test grades suffer as a result.

  • Homework is like slavery.

    It's basically forcing students to go home after a stressful day of school and activities and do pointless homework. Teachers should be teaching these things in class, not making the students learn it themselves. It's preventing children from leading balanced lifestyles, with a healthy amount of sleep and activities to keep them fit and active. How is a student supposed to do 3 to 4 hours of homework, study for a plethora of tests and quizzes, play sports, get involved in the community, eat food with nutritional value, and get an adequate amount of sleep, all in one day? That's not possible. The amount of stress homework causes kids is ridiculous, especially when they're already under so much pressure to get into a good college and do well in school, along with making friends and staying active. Homework is not necessary.

  • Homework should be banned.

    Why Homework Is Bad
    Are you a kid who hates homework!? Well I am one! Did you know that homework leads to bad grades and overwhelmed cranky kids? It can also lead to stressed out children that can throw fits. Also, homework gives less time for a kid to be a kid. There should be no homework for all children. No homework is even good for teachers because they don’t need to correct it because they already have enough to correct

    In some schools children can get homework as early as kindergarten, or by the third grade. Homework has been annoying many children by the fourth grade. At elementary school, especially, this is a bad idea because many young students are known for having very short attention spans. They have already been forced to sit and learn for approximately 6 1/2 hours at school, with usually only 2 short recess breaks and lunch and they are also very known to like to talk and chat a lot.

    By the time school is out, the kids just want to go home, relax, and be who they are ! It also affects families because Homework trouble = school trouble = family trouble. It is the rare for a child to enjoy homework F.Y.I. .For some students they can be stressed out when they get home and throw fits and for all students they have been exercising their brains at school all day long and at home they are supposed to relax their brain for the next day at school, and if you are not remembering good blame it on the teacher for putting the subject at the wrong time when the students are tired (after recess etc.) or the teacher is not explaining it good.


    Some teachers do not answer a students question which would of helped the student to learn better and teachers always used to say to me “Learning is fun!” well I think now math and school now is a lot harder than in the 70’s and 80’s and put for an example a 10 year old in fifth grade with 6 1/2 hours of school and 45-50 minutes of homework and remember 2013 math is A LOT harder than 80’s and 70’s math so do you think you would be having fun? and I also want to state that homework causes cases of kids hating school (like me). So that concludes the end of my persuasive essay top three reasons homework is bad: overwhelming, interference and dislike.

    One country named Finland has already fixed their school system there is no homework there is recess for 75 minutes, 9-17 students per class and no tests until you are 16 years old.

  • Homework should be banned because it just isn't useful and wastes time.

    Homework is pointless because kids do enough work in school and they don't need more. When they come home they want to chill out, hang out with friends, or do something. Kids are in school for 8 hours a day doing work, other than lunch and recess. Homework is not relevant for kids. I did a survey at school at resource, and a majority of kids say that homework should be banned in school because it is stressful and they procrastinate until the last second. There is no point in homework. It takes away from spending time with family. According to the text with research 'Homework Should be Banned,' “Schools has increased from 9 to 3 with 1 ½ hour of recess and lunch to 8:40 to 3:15 with only 30 minutes of lunch and recess.” This quote shows that too much is just too much homework. Also, another reason is that, according to research, some of the smartest countries like Finland and Japan don’t have homework. We can be just as smart as them without homework. This shows that homework has no academic benefits for grades.

  • I am a teacher, and Yes!!

    Yes! Ban homework.. As part of our school policy, homework must be given out, and students should complete 30minutes of homework,, per night! I think this is too much as many students have other commitments.
    Sport practices, jobs to do around home, looking after siblings, at after school care etc
    It is a hassle for the teacher to mark/grade and make up something that is remotely fun,and enjoyable for the children to do

  • It hinders learning which is obviously a bad thing.

    Undoubtedly, homework hinders learning. There are only 2 outcomes possible when doing homework:
    A) You do the homework, proving you were able to do it in the first place and the work was therefore unnecessary.
    B) You do not do the homework because you were unable, and therefore did not learn anything.

    Even besides these points, there are other reasons why homework hinders learning. For example, homework has to be corrected, wasting valuable class time which could be spent teaching new skills. It is an unnecessary burden on children which causes great stress, and actively teaches them to hate learning. Learning has to be an enjoyable experience to be effective, and if children grow to hate a subject because of the homework they receive, it will mean they learn much less in class. Stress can also affect sleep and eating patterns, thus resulting in lower scores in exams. I could go on forever, there are literally no benefits to homework. Work is for work related-things, home is where you can relax. This line should not be blurred.

  • As a student, I think it should be banned.

    As a student, I don't get home from school until 4:30 or 5:00 and I am doing homework sometimes until 8:30 almost every night. It is very stressful when you have seven classes a day and homework in every single class; it becomes very overwhelming. On top of that, I have to get up every morning at 5:30 am just to catch my buss at 6:40. Many mornings are very hard for me because of lack of sleep from the night before staying up doing homework and studying for two or three tests the next day.

    If they banned homework, test scores might improve because then students would have more time to study and be prepared than if we have five different subjects to do on top of studying for a test the next day.

  • Homework should be banned to reduce student stress.

    Homework causes stress in many students. Homework takes time, and it keeps students up late at night getting the work done. The loss of sleep makes it hard to concentrate during class because students are so tired.

    I once stayed up until midnight and wound up very tired when morning arrived. It was hard to focus on my lessons. As a student,I think sleep is more important than doing homework. Students study during the day at schools and academies,so there is no reason that we have to get homework.

    Many schools have a one-hour rule, but with multiple classes and each teacher assigning one hour of homework, you end up with hours of work to do at home. Students in advanced levels get even more work than the students in basic classes.

    Another reason is that the noise around us. If you have a room of your own, you don't have to worry about this problem. I don't have my own room. I have to do my homework in the study. When I'm working, my mom is busy printing things out. It's annoying and makes it hard for me to concentrate. I can't do my homework before I sleep. I have to complete my homework in the morning when she's not using the study, before I head for the academy. Getting it done in the morning means rushing. Usually, the answer are wrong because I didn't have time to really read the questions.

    Students often think homework should be banned. I think so too.

  • Homework wastes time

    Homework is a serious waste of time, there are some benefits of homework but the negatives out-rule the benefits by a mile. Most teachers say homework helps responsibility and our knowledge but this is not true. I as student personally think that kids are responsible and organize ourselves better than our teachers at times. On a weekday, this is my usual agenda,
    Wake up in the morning, Catch the bus, Get off at the correct stop, take a train, and walk 10 minutes to my school. I then have to go to the school office and drop off my phone, and my wallet. I then have to walk to my locker and get out my keys (if I forget them I have to walk to the Principles office which is quite far away and get the master key) and get out my books. I have to carry them to Homeroom and since I have a job as Office Monitor I have to collect any forms from the other kids and go all the way down to the General Office and drop them off. I then have to go to whatever room we have Period 1 in. Since I go on my own, I have to know where everything is and what room to go to, I cant just follow a classmate like most kids in my class do. If I am late that automatically means a 2 hour detention for me. Just my luck that my name is first on the roll call list. I do my work for that session and do the same until recess. At recess I go to the office, collect my money and buy myself lunch. I then have to survive another 3 sessions. I then catch the bus and go home so thats organized for you! I have written 300 words so Im done with my homework! My name is Anthony and I am 14 years old.

  • It takes too much time.

    I have not enough family time to spend playing games, opening presents, playing with my little sisters or to spend time with my mom or dad. I think homework takes too much time. I want more free time, less homework, and more time with my friends, my dog or outside with nature.

  • Homework – is it an unnecessary evil or a sound and valuable pedagogical practice? The media coverage of the debate often zeroes in on these two seemingly polar opposite views, even though they may not be all that far apart. Homework can be good until – well, until it isn’t. Assign too much or the wrong kind (or both) and the law of diminishing returns kicks in, says Dr. Harris Cooper, professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University, resulting in undue stress for students, aggravation for parents and no academic pay-off. 

    But as Cooper, author of “The Battle Over Homework: Common Ground for Administrators, Teachers, and Parents,” recently told NEA Today, homework levels and parental attitudes haven’t really changed dramatically over the years. Cooper also concludes – perhaps a shock of those who are convinced that very little in our classrooms is working as it should – “the vast majority of educators have got it right.”  

    There’s a lot of focus on homework now, but has it been scrutinized so heavily in the past? 

    Harris Cooper: Throughout the 20th century, the public battle over homework was quite cyclical. You can go back to World War I or a little after, when it was considered important for kids to exercise their brain like a muscle and that homework was a way to do that. During the 1930s, opinions changed. In the 1950s, people were worried about falling behind the communists, so more homework was needed as a way to speed up our education and technology. During the 1960s, homework fell out of favor because many though it inflicted too much stress on kids. In the 1970s and 1980s, we needed more homework to keep up with the Japanese economically. More recently, as everything about education and teachers is being scrutinized, homework has come into question again.

    What’s interesting is that the actual percentage of people who support or oppose homework has changed very little over the years. And the actual amount of homework kids are doing has changed very little over the last 65 years.

    But haven’t we seen an uptick in the amount of homework assigned to elementary students?

    HC: There is a little bit of an uptick in lower grades. But when you look at the actual numbers, we’re talking about the difference between an average of 20 minutes and 30 minutes. So you’ll find some people who say the amount of homework being given to 2nd graders, for example, has increased 50 percent. But If you look at the actual numbers, it’s ten more minutes per night.

    And probably a driving force behind that is obviously end-of-grade testing and accountability issues. Perhaps more legitimately is the importance of early reading. As they say, in third grade you learn to read, and in fourth grade you read to learn. So this has led to more reading assignments.

    While most high school students are still doing approximately the same amount of homework on average, there’s a great deal of variation. That’s due to choices some kids make about how rigorous an academic program to take and the increased competition over college admissions. So there are a lot of kids out there taking four or five advanced placement and honors classes now, which might not have been the case a while back.

    According to the MetLife Foundation national homework survey, 3 out of 5 parents said their kids are getting just the right amount of homework. One said too much and one said too little. That survey is a few years old now but I doubt that’s changed.

    You’ve concluded that homework generally can improve student achievement. At what grade levels do we usually see this effect? 

    HC: There’s very little correlation between homework and achievement in the early grades. As kids get older, the correlation gets stronger. But there are experimental studies even at the earliest grades that look at skills such as spelling, math facts, etc. where kids are randomly assigned to do homework and not do homework. They show that kids who did the homework performed better.

    But we’re really talking about correlation here, so we have to be a little careful. It’s also worth noting that these correlations with older students are likely caused, not only by homework helping achievement, but also by kids who have higher achievement levels doing more homework.

    But at a particular point more homework is not a good thing. You’ve heard of the “10-Minute Rule,” where you multiply a child’s grade by 10 to determine how many minutes you assign per night. This rule fits the data. So 20-minutes for a second grader is where you’d start. In middle schools, it’s between 60-90 mins for 6th through 9th graders, about two hours later in high school. When you assign more than these levels, the law of diminishing returns or even negative effects – stress especially – begin to appear.

    Have school districts coalesced around the 10-minute rule?

    HC: From my experience, I have never seen a school district that recommends anything that isn’t consistent with the 10-minute rule. They won’t use the term “10-minute rule” usually, but they’ll say, primary school grades will be assigned up to 30 mins., grades 4-6 up to an hour, things like that. But If you translate the policy to the 10-minute rule, it’ll be very similar. Nobody has a policy that says you can expect your second-graders to bring home two hours of homework. The only place you’ll see a warning about it is in high school: you can expect half an hour a night per academic subject. Again, if the kid is taking AP, expect more.

    What don’t we know about homework? Where are the gaps in the research?

    HC: We need to know more about the the differing impacts by subject matter. Regarding the 10-minute rule, one question I am frequently asked is, “Does that include reading?” Generally, the answer would be yes, but if we’re interested in kids’ stress level, for example, they are more likely to burn out quicker doing math worksheets and studying vocabulary than if they were doing high-interest reading. So we really need more work on subject matter, on homework quality, on the level of inquisitiveness that it engenders and the way it motivates. Also we need to know more about the use of the Internet, especially as it relates to potential disparities between rich and poor and the ability to research at home.

    Parental involvement is a huge homework-related issue. How can educators work with parents to keep their role constructive? 

    HC: Parental involvement is more important in the earlier grades and teachers should try to make sure that parents have the skills to teach the material so to avoid any instructional confusion. Educators should also remind parents to not place great pressure on their child and to model behaviors, especially with young children. For example, when the child is doing math homework, a parent could balance the checkbook to demonstrate how the skill can be used in adult life, or they can they read their own book while their child is reading.

    Homework also keeps parents aware of what their child is learning. I’ve had some very emotional parents come to me about having been told by teachers that their child is struggling, that there might be a learning disability. The parents don’t necessarily see it until they see their child work on homework.

    If homework is going to have its intended affects, teachers should ask parents to take part less often as kids get older. If support from parents is withdrawn slowly, it can promote autonomous learning – teaching kids that they can learn on their own and they can learn anywhere.

    Do you think overall the current debate or controversy over homework has been helpful and what, if anything, should educators take from it?

    HC: Well, I recognize that the debate will always be there, but I generally choose to ignore it, or at least the people who, as the old saying goes, use science the same way a drunkard uses a lamp post – more for support than for illumination.

    Homework is probably the most complicated pedagogical strategy teachers use because it’s open to variations due to child individual differences and the home context. But the vast majority of educators have got it right. They’re not going to satisfy everyone, because kids take homework home to different environments and to parents with different expectations. But, like I said before, three in five parents are satisfied and there’s one in each direction – too much homework or too little. That probably means teachers are doing their job properly.

    Photo: Associated Press

    0 thoughts on “Debates About Homework

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *